Toddler

Toddler

Your child is no longer a baby. They are now active, curious creatures busy learning about themselves and their world. Toddlers are little scientists testing and exploring everything. They are sure to keep you on your toes. Safety becomes more important than ever during this stage. Your child is discovering their sense of self and will want to try new things, but is still eager to be comforted by you. Celebrate their efforts and help them problem solve through trial and error. These can be challenging times as toddlers assert their new found independence. “No!” becomes their favorite word. You can help guide them through this stage by gently and consistently enforcing rules and modeling self-control by staying calm during tantrums.

What to Expect

Click here for a downloadable developmental checklist for your 2 year old and ways you can help with their development

Social & Emotional

  • Copies others, especially adults and older children
  • Gets excited when with other children
  • Shows more and more independence
  • Shows defiant behavior (doing what he has been told not to)
  • Plays mainly beside other children, but is beginning to include other children, such as in chase games

Language/Communication

  • Points to things or pictures when they are named
  • Knows names of familiar people and body parts
  • Says sentences with 2 to 4 words
  • Follows simple instructions
  • Repeats words overheard in conversation
  • Points to things in a book

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

  • Finds things even when hidden under two or three covers
  • Begins to sort shapes and colors
  • Completes sentences and rhymes in familiar books
  • Plays simple make-believe games
  • Builds towers of 4 or more blocks
  • Might use one hand more than the other
  • Follows two-step instructions such as “Pick up your shoes and put them in the closet.”
  • Names items in a picture book such as a cat, bird, or dog

Movement/Physical Development

  • Stands on tiptoe
  • Kicks a ball
  • Begins to run
  • Climbs onto and down from furniture without help
  • Walks up and down stairs holding on
  • Throws ball overhand
  • Makes or copies straight lines and circles

Talk to your Doctor if...

  • Doesn’t use 2-word phrases (for example, “drink milk”)
  • Doesn’t know what to do with common things, like a brush, phone, fork, spoon
  • Doesn’t copy actions and words
  • Doesn’t follow simple instructions
  • Doesn’t walk steadily
  • Loses skills she once had

Tell your child’s doctor or nurse if you notice any of these signs of possible delays for this age.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children be screened for general development using standardized, validated tools at 9, 18, and 24 or 30 months and for autism at 18 and 24 months or whenever a parent or provider has a concern. Ask your child’s doctor about your child’s developmental screening.

Click here for a downloadable developmental checklist for your 18 month old and ways you can help with their development

Social & Emotional

  • Likes to hand things to others as play
  • May have temper tantrums
  • May be afraid of strangers
  • Shows affection to familiar people
  • Plays simple pretend, such as feeding a doll
  • May cling to caregivers in new situations
  • Points to show others something interesting
  • Explores alone but with parent close by

Language/Communication

  • Says several single words
  • Says and shakes head “no”
  • Points to show someone what he wants

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

  • Knows what ordinary things are for; for example, telephone, brush, spoon
  • Points to get the attention of others
  • Shows interest in a doll or stuffed animal by pretending to feed
  • Points to one body part
  • Scribbles on his own
  • Can follow 1-step verbal commands without any gestures; for example, sits when you say “sit down”

Movement/Physical Development

  • Walks alone
  • May walk up steps and run
  • Pulls toys while walking
  • Can help undress herself
  • Drinks from a cup
  • Eats with a spoon

Talk to your Doctor if...

  • Doesn’t point to show things to others
  • Can’t walk
  • Doesn’t know what familiar things are for
  • Doesn’t copy others
  • Doesn’t gain new words
  • Doesn’t have at least 6 words
  • Doesn’t notice or mind when a caregiver leaves or returns
  • Loses skills he once had

Tell your child’s doctor or nurse if you notice any of these signs of possible delays for this age.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children be screened for general development using standardized, validated tools at 9, 18, and 24 or 30 months and for autism at 18 and 24 months or whenever a parent or provider has a concern. Ask your child’s doctor about your child’s developmental screening.

Some local resources for your toddler include

Medical Provider/OB

Pediatrician

Early Head Start

Welcome Newborns(Potty Training Info)

Pregnancy Services of Delta

Home Visiting Programs

Department of Health & Human Services

Public Health Department

Great Start to Quality

Great Start Parent Coalition

www.babycenter.com- the discipline tool kit-successful strategies for every age

If you are curious about your child's development click here to take an online screening

If you are curious about your child's social and emotional development click here to take an online screening